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Bogota Business English and Authors Conversation Club Preview: July 11th

Hey friends,

We’ve changed the topic for tonight’s conversation club at the last minute. We are going to be talking about the Pico y Placa system. So bring all of your thoughts, opinions and/or complaints tonight. We’re going to figure out how to say all of that stuff in English!

The Conversation Club is held at Authors Bookstore on Calle 70 #5-23 at 6pm. Bring some friend to enjoy this cool environment.

Here’s a bit of a preview for tonight’s club so that you can get familiar with the vocabulary:

 

Check out this GREAT YouTube video!

 

“Let’s Talk About…”

Pica y Placa

 

Vocabulary Bank

n. Traffic control system v. to fight traffic adj. effective / ineffective
n. license plate; or

license plate number.

v. to have patience

 

adj. patient
n. even number; or odd number. v. to end with adj.  delayed

i.e. I’m delayed in traffic so I’ll arrive late.

n. rush hour n. commute v. to carpool adj. congested or adj. jammed

i.e.  The streets are really congested (or jammed) during rush hour.

*Do you know what all of these words mean? Discuss with your group or ask a native speaker if you need clarification! Try to figure them out!

Conversation  topics…

  1. Pico y placa? What do you think, good or bad? Effective or ineffective? How does this traffic control system work?
  2. What number does your license plate end with? Would prefer your license plate to end with an even or odd number?
  3. How long does rush hour last in Bogota? What do you do while you’re stuck in traffic?
  4. Name 5 things you think could help improve traffic in our city. What can you do to promote these things?
  5. How long is your commute to the office and/or school? If you drive a car, have you ever tried to organize a carpool with your friends, colleagues or neighbors?

Phrasal Verb: Come

These exercises are about using the verb ‘to come’ combined with particles, thanks to Caroline Brown English Lessons. Here are some of the most common:

‘to come across’ means to find something by chance.

  • Here is an old photo of me. I came across it when I was looking for my passport.
  • I love this painting. I came across it in the attic when I was cleaning up.

‘to come apart’ means to break into separate pieces.

  • It broke when I picked it up. Everything just came apart.
  • It’s quite big but you can pack it into a small box. It comes apart very easily.

‘to come down’ means to fall, to decrease.

  • The price of petrol has come down since the beginning of the year. It’s much cheaper now.
  • She has taken some aspirin so her temperature has come down.

‘to come from’ = to have as your country or place of origin.

  • You know by his accent that he comes from South Africa.
  • I come from York, a beautiful city in the north of England.

‘to come out’ = to be released, to be available to the public

  • His new book comes out next month. I’m sure it will be a bestseller.
  • Their new CD came out only a few weeks ago and has already sold millions.

‘to come out’ can also mean to leave a room or a building

  • He stayed in his office until he had finished the report. He didn’t come out all day.
  • He was waiting for me when I came out of work.

‘to come up’ = to arise unexpectedly

  • I’m sorry but I’ll be late. Something has come up.
  • A great opportunity has just come up for a job in the marketing department.

‘to come up’ = to be mentioned, talked about

  • We were talking about different people we knew and his name came up in the conversation.
  • I don’t want to talk about it so I hope it doesn’t come up.

‘to come up with’ = to think of, imagine a solution or idea

  • I asked Larry for some suggestions and he came up with a lot of very good ideas.
  • I’m sorry but I haven’t come up with any solution yet. I don’t know what we can do.

‘to come off’ = to become unstuck

  • I don’t know what is in the box, the label has come off.
  • When I tried to open the door, the handle came off in my hand!

Why don’t you contact us today?

Phrasal Verbs with Up

We expand on another post on phrasal verbs with UP, with more examples.

One common use for ‘up’ in phrasal verbs is to indicate

  • An upward movement
  • An increase
  • An improvement

See how that applies to these eight verbs.

If you display something such as a poster, you ‘put it up’ on a wall or a notice-board.

  • Have you seen the warning the boss has put up on the notice-board?
  • Can you put up a poster in your window?

If somebody is miserable and you want them to be happier, you can tell them to ‘cheer up’.

  • You look really unhappy. Cheer up!
  • I wrote Pearson a letter to try to cheer him up a bit.

If you are sitting and then you rise from your chair, you ‘stand up’.

  • When the President arrives, everybody must stand up.
  • Stand up straight when I am speaking to you.

If a party or a seminar is dull, you need to ‘liven it up’.

  • You need to liven up your ideas.
  • How can we liven up this presentation?

If you want to make something stronger, you can ‘build it up’.

  • I have built up a strong team of workers.
  • I have been ill and need to build up my strength.

I can’t hear very well these days – I’m old. When you speak to me, you need to speaker, to ‘speak up’.

  • Can you speak up? There is a lot of background noise.
  • It is a big room. You will have to speak up so that those in the back can hear.

The place where you lived when you were a child is where you ‘grew up’.

  • I was born in Scotland but grew up in England.
  • Where did you grow up?

If something increases fast, it ‘shoots up’.

  • The price of petrol has shot up recently.
  • My English scores shot up after I started studying with Pearson.

There is a group of expressions using ‘up’ where the ‘up’ is not necessary. For example you can say ‘fill’ or ‘fill up’ and it means almost the same thing. So why do we add the ‘up’? Well one possible answer is that ‘we do it because we do it’ – we have just developed the habit of adding ‘up’. However, often the ‘up’ seems to ‘intensify’ the verb, to make it more ‘complete’.

Look at these examples and see what I mean.

If you are late, you need to ‘hurry up’.

  • Please hurry up. We are terribly late.
  • We need to hurry up or we will miss our flight.

You can ‘ring up’ somebody on the telephone.

  • I will ring you up when I get back.
  • You can ring me up if you need any help.

If you cut your skin, it needs to ‘heal up’.

  • This will take a week to heal up.
  • I cut myself shaving and it will not heal up.

Before I go on a long journey, I have to ‘fill up’ my car with petrol ( or if I were in the US ‘gas’.)

  • I need to fill up my car.
  • The concert filled up quickly and not everybody could get in.

When I send a package, I ‘wrap it up’ well.

  • Could you wrap this up for me?
  • They didn’t wrap it up properly and it got damaged.

If you have something valuable, it is a good idea to ‘lock it up’.

  • He did not lock up his desk properly and somebody stole his calculator.
  • I think they should lock up pedophiles for a very long time.

If you don’t have enough money to buy something, you need to ‘save up’.

  • I am saving up to go on a trip to New York.
  • You’ll have to save up if you want to buy a car.

When things are in a mess, you need to ‘tidy them up’.

  • We need to tidy up the office before the visitor comes.
  • Tidy up your desk. It’s such a mess.

Contact BBE today and let us help you with your English!

thanks to business-english.com for great phrasal verb ideas…. 

Phrasal Verbs: Look Part II

It just doesn’t stop. So many varations with “look,” let’s keep looking at the options. Having trouble? Contact us today. 

to look on’ means to watch something happen.

  • The Police just looked on as the demonstrators marched peacefully through the streets.
  • Nobody helped me. They just looked on as I struggled to get up off the street.

‘to look on’ also means to consider someone or something in a special way.

  • We are very close. I look on him as my brother.
  • Don’t look on not getting the job as a failure. It’s not.

‘to look out’ means be careful. It is always an order.

  • Look out! The boss is coming.
  • Look out! You’re going to fall.

‘to look out for’ means to watch carefully around you so you will notice something or someone in particular.

  • When you go to the conference, look out for Anna. She will be there.
  • Janet is twenty next week. Can you look out for a present when you are in the shops?

‘to look out for’ can also mean to take care of someone.

  • Will is a great brother. He always looks out for his sisters.
  • She’s very selfish. She just looks out for herself.

‘to look over’ means to quickly examine something.

  • At the end of the exam, I only had a few minutes to look over what I had written.
  • The doctor quickly looked him over before sending him for an x-ray.

‘to look round’ means to walk through a building or place to have a look at it.

  • When you travel on business, you don’t have time to look round the places you visit.
  • The first time we looked round the house, we knew it was the house for us.

‘to look through’ means to quickly examine a text or some things.

  • I decided to give half my clothes away when I had looked through them.
  • We looked through the list of applicants and made a shortlist of the six best qualified.

‘to look up’ means to find a piece of information in a book or other source of information.

  • I didn’t know the word so I looked it up in the dictionary.
  • I looked their address up in the Yellow Pages.

‘to look up to’ means to respect and admire someone.

  • My father’s wonderful. He’s the person I most look up to.
  • All his employees look up to him and admire him

Once again, thanks to carolinebrownenglishlessons.com. Great resource! 

Phrasal Verbs: Look

‘to look after’ means to take care of someone or something.

  • When I have to travel on business, my parents usually look after my children.
  • I look after the office when my colleagues are away on business.

‘to look ahead’ means to think about and plan the future.

  • We have to look ahead and try to estimate our needs for the next few years.
  • In this business, it’s very difficult to look ahead and predict what will happen.

‘to look at’ means to read something quickly and not very thoroughly.

  • Could you look at my report and tell me if you think it’s OK?
  • I looked at your figures and they seem fine to me.

‘to look at’ can also mean to investigate or think carefully about a problem or situation.

  • Costs are getting out of control. We need to look at them closely.
  • John looked at renting cars but it would be too expensive.

‘to look back’ means to think about something that happened in the past.

  • I realise I was very naive when I look back.
  • If we look back over the last three years, we can see many times when we were very successful.

‘to look down on’ means to think something or someone is inferior.

  • The people who work in Headquarters always look down on the people in the branches.
  • Don’t look down on him just because he left school at 16. He has been very successful.

‘to look for’ means to try to find something lost or that you need.

  • My assistant is leaving at the end of the month. I’m looking for a new one.
  • He has been looking for a job for ages now.

‘to look forward to’ means to feel excited and happy about something that is going to happen.

  • I’m seeing him on Tuesday. I’m really looking forward to it.
  • We’re looking forward to our English classes. 

‘to look in’ means to visit someone for a short time.

  • I’ll look in on my way home and we can have a cup of tea.
  • Look in on Jenny and check that she is still working.

‘to look into’ means to examine a problem or situation.

  • My boss asked me to look into English classes at BBE.
  • We have set up a working group to look into the problem.

Let BBE help you with your phrasal verb problems! 

 

Thanks to Carolinebrownenglishlessons.org for the info

Phrasal Verbs with Out

If you ‘fall out’ with somebody, you have a bad argument with them.

  • They fell out over the arrangements for the meeting.
  • I don’t want to fall out with you but I’m very unhappy with what you have done.

If news ‘leaks out’, people who shouldn’t know about it do.

  • Details of the report leaked out over the weekend.
  • If this information leaks out, we are in serious trouble.

If you ‘come out with’ something, you say something suddenly.

  • She came straight out with it and said I was a liar.
  • You never know what he is going to come out with next.

If you ‘come out with’ a new product , you make available something new.

  • Microsoft have come out with a new version of Office.
  • We haven’t come out with a new product for two years.

If you ‘give out’ information,  you hand it out to people.

  • I’ll give out a summary at the end so you don’t need to take notes.
  • Could you give those papers out for me, please?

If something ‘gives out’, it stops working or supplies run out.

  • Our stock of leather will give out in three days, if we don’t get any more.
    My voice is about to give out so I’ll stop my presentation at this point.

If you are ‘let out’ of something, it can mean that you escape from doing something difficult or unpleasant or that you have agreed to do.

  • They won’t let us out of our contract with them.
  • He resigned this morning which lets me out from having to fire him.

If you ‘make something out’, it can mean that you are able to see or hear something with difficulty.

  • I couldn’t make out what he was saying with all that background noise.
  • I can’t make out who sent me this letter.

To ‘make out something’ can mean to claim falsely that something is true.

  • He made out that he had a lot of experience in this area but it wasn’t true.
  • He’s not as difficult a person as he is often made out to be.

If you are ‘put out’, it can mean that you are annoyed or caused extra work by something that is said or done.

  • He seemed put out that we didn’t ask him to join us for lunch.
  • I don’t want to put you out. Don’t do it if it is too much bother.

Put out by English? Why don’t you get in touch with BBE?