Tag Archive | aprender ingles en bogota

Phrasal Verbs: Look

‘to look after’ means to take care of someone or something.

  • When I have to travel on business, my parents usually look after my children.
  • I look after the office when my colleagues are away on business.

‘to look ahead’ means to think about and plan the future.

  • We have to look ahead and try to estimate our needs for the next few years.
  • In this business, it’s very difficult to look ahead and predict what will happen.

‘to look at’ means to read something quickly and not very thoroughly.

  • Could you look at my report and tell me if you think it’s OK?
  • I looked at your figures and they seem fine to me.

‘to look at’ can also mean to investigate or think carefully about a problem or situation.

  • Costs are getting out of control. We need to look at them closely.
  • John looked at renting cars but it would be too expensive.

‘to look back’ means to think about something that happened in the past.

  • I realise I was very naive when I look back.
  • If we look back over the last three years, we can see many times when we were very successful.

‘to look down on’ means to think something or someone is inferior.

  • The people who work in Headquarters always look down on the people in the branches.
  • Don’t look down on him just because he left school at 16. He has been very successful.

‘to look for’ means to try to find something lost or that you need.

  • My assistant is leaving at the end of the month. I’m looking for a new one.
  • He has been looking for a job for ages now.

‘to look forward to’ means to feel excited and happy about something that is going to happen.

  • I’m seeing him on Tuesday. I’m really looking forward to it.
  • We’re looking forward to our English classes. 

‘to look in’ means to visit someone for a short time.

  • I’ll look in on my way home and we can have a cup of tea.
  • Look in on Jenny and check that she is still working.

‘to look into’ means to examine a problem or situation.

  • My boss asked me to look into English classes at BBE.
  • We have set up a working group to look into the problem.

Let BBE help you with your phrasal verb problems! 

 

Thanks to Carolinebrownenglishlessons.org for the info

Prepositions of Place

UsageAt, on, in:

At, on and in are prepositions of place and show the position of people, places and things:

e.g. at the cinema on the wall in the shop

StructureAt:

at + the + place: the cinema, theatre, school, BBE, cross roads etc.. e.g. at the bank.

at + specific place: Heathrow Airport, Buckingham Palace: e.g. at Notre Dame Cathedral.

at + specific address including the house number/name: e.g. at 33 rue de La Fayette, Paris.

N.B. In English, at is not normally used with names of villages, towns and cities.

StructureOn:

on + a/the + surface of a place or object: shelf, wall, floor, ceiling etc.. e.g. on the table.

on + the directions: left/right/other side/nearside/far side: e.g. on the left.

on + levels of a building: first floor, second floor, top floor etc.. e.g. on the ground floor.

on + the + parts of a ship: port side/ starboard side/bow/stern.

on + parts of the body: his foot, her leg, our heads etc.. e.g. on his left arm.

on + a/the + types of transport: horse, bicycle, train, foot etc.. e.g. on the ferry, on a horse.

N.B. English people say in a car not on a car ).

StructureIn:

in + names of countries: France, England, Poland etc.. e.g. in Belgium.

in + names of towns, villages, cities: Warsaw, London etc.. e.g. in Brussels.

in + named places: Buckingham Palace, the Louvre etc.. e.g. in Windsor Castle.

in + the + geographical regions: Auvergne, Lake District etc.. e.g. in the Alps.

in + streets, roads, avenues: Moniuszki, Fish Street etc.. e.g. in Stratford Avenue.

in + the + rooms and places: kitchen, bedroom, foyer, auditorium etc.. e.g. in the bathroom.

in + the + weather: sun, rain, hail, snow etc.. e.g. in the fog.

in + parts of the body: his foot, her leg, our heads etc.. e.g. in his foot.

in + a/the + types of transport: car, train, van, lorry, aeroplane, ship e.g. in a train.

PrepositionsExceptions:

A: In English, certain expressions are different, so must be learnt!

at the moment on holiday in a loud/angry/quiet/low voice

at this/that moment on the radio in a good/bad mood

at the same time on television in a bad temper

at no time on the menu in a suit

at present on the agenda in a new dress

at the end/beginning in clean/dirty/new shoes

B: Some expressions are used without a/the, here are some common examples:

at school in bed

at home in business

at school in hospital

at school in prison

at work

at university

at 37 k.p.h.

C: Both on and in can be used for types of transport and parts of the body:

On is used when the part of the body/type of transport is the most important detail.

In is used when position is the most important piece of information.

e.g. Peter travelled to London on the train. – type

John sat in the last carriage of the London train. – position

Joanna has a cut on her left arm. – part of the body

Ania has broken a bone in her wrist. – position in the body

D: At and in can be used with places which can contain large numbers of people: cinema, theatre, church, stadium etc..

At is used when the activity is the most important piece of information.

In is used when the place/position is the most important detail.

e.g. I will meet you for a meal at the usual restaurant.

Richard and Magda met in the foyer of the Royal Theatre.

E: Both at and to can be used with places:

At is used when there is no active movement in the phrase/sentence.

To is used when there is movement in the phrase/sentence

e.g. At school, there are forty teachers and four hundred pupils. – no movement

Marcin is cycling to London to visit his friends. – movement

F: Both at and to can follow certain verbs: the meaning of the verb is different in each case: to throw, run, shout.

e.g. Bill threw a stone to me. ( a friendly action )

Bill threw a stone at me. ( a hostile action: intending to hurt someone )

Maria ran to me. ( a friendly action )

Maria ran at me ( a hostile action: intending to attack )

Eric shouted to me. ( a friendly action )

Eric shouted at me ( a hostile action: intending to express anger )

G: The preposition by is often used with transport when the type of transport is very important: the common examples are: by aeroplane, bicycle, horse, car, ferry, horse, lorry, ship, train

e.g. The businessmen travelled to Africa by aeroplane and in Africa, they travelled by car.

N.B. Walking is travel on foot ( not by foot )

Note: Thanks to world-english.org for the information!

Present Perfect Again

The present perfect simple is have/has + past participle. The past participle often ends in -ed, but many important verbs are irregular.

When we say that “something has happened,” this is usually new information:

  • Damn! I’ve cut my finger.
  • The road is closed. There’s been (there has been) an accident.
  • (from the news) Police have arrested two men in connection with the robbery.
  • I have contacted Bogotá Business English to help me learn.

When we use the present perfect, there isa connection with this moment. It’s an action in the past that has a result of now.

  • Where’s your key? I don’t know. I’ve lost it. (I don’t have it now)
  • He told me his name, but I’ve forgotten it. (I can’t remember it now)
  • Is Sally here? No, she’s gone out. (She is out now)
  • I can’t find my bag. Have you seen it? (Do you know where it is now?)

At BBE, we wish we have written all of this information, but we haven’t. We are very grateful to to Raymond Murphy, whom has published some wonderful guides entitled Essential Grammar in Use. If you wish to find more information by Mr. Murphy, search through various websites or contact BBE and let us help you get any study guide you may desire!