Tag Archive | inglés

Phrasal Verbs: Look Part II

It just doesn’t stop. So many varations with “look,” let’s keep looking at the options. Having trouble? Contact us today. 

to look on’ means to watch something happen.

  • The Police just looked on as the demonstrators marched peacefully through the streets.
  • Nobody helped me. They just looked on as I struggled to get up off the street.

‘to look on’ also means to consider someone or something in a special way.

  • We are very close. I look on him as my brother.
  • Don’t look on not getting the job as a failure. It’s not.

‘to look out’ means be careful. It is always an order.

  • Look out! The boss is coming.
  • Look out! You’re going to fall.

‘to look out for’ means to watch carefully around you so you will notice something or someone in particular.

  • When you go to the conference, look out for Anna. She will be there.
  • Janet is twenty next week. Can you look out for a present when you are in the shops?

‘to look out for’ can also mean to take care of someone.

  • Will is a great brother. He always looks out for his sisters.
  • She’s very selfish. She just looks out for herself.

‘to look over’ means to quickly examine something.

  • At the end of the exam, I only had a few minutes to look over what I had written.
  • The doctor quickly looked him over before sending him for an x-ray.

‘to look round’ means to walk through a building or place to have a look at it.

  • When you travel on business, you don’t have time to look round the places you visit.
  • The first time we looked round the house, we knew it was the house for us.

‘to look through’ means to quickly examine a text or some things.

  • I decided to give half my clothes away when I had looked through them.
  • We looked through the list of applicants and made a shortlist of the six best qualified.

‘to look up’ means to find a piece of information in a book or other source of information.

  • I didn’t know the word so I looked it up in the dictionary.
  • I looked their address up in the Yellow Pages.

‘to look up to’ means to respect and admire someone.

  • My father’s wonderful. He’s the person I most look up to.
  • All his employees look up to him and admire him

Once again, thanks to carolinebrownenglishlessons.com. Great resource! 

Phrasal Verbs: Look

‘to look after’ means to take care of someone or something.

  • When I have to travel on business, my parents usually look after my children.
  • I look after the office when my colleagues are away on business.

‘to look ahead’ means to think about and plan the future.

  • We have to look ahead and try to estimate our needs for the next few years.
  • In this business, it’s very difficult to look ahead and predict what will happen.

‘to look at’ means to read something quickly and not very thoroughly.

  • Could you look at my report and tell me if you think it’s OK?
  • I looked at your figures and they seem fine to me.

‘to look at’ can also mean to investigate or think carefully about a problem or situation.

  • Costs are getting out of control. We need to look at them closely.
  • John looked at renting cars but it would be too expensive.

‘to look back’ means to think about something that happened in the past.

  • I realise I was very naive when I look back.
  • If we look back over the last three years, we can see many times when we were very successful.

‘to look down on’ means to think something or someone is inferior.

  • The people who work in Headquarters always look down on the people in the branches.
  • Don’t look down on him just because he left school at 16. He has been very successful.

‘to look for’ means to try to find something lost or that you need.

  • My assistant is leaving at the end of the month. I’m looking for a new one.
  • He has been looking for a job for ages now.

‘to look forward to’ means to feel excited and happy about something that is going to happen.

  • I’m seeing him on Tuesday. I’m really looking forward to it.
  • We’re looking forward to our English classes. 

‘to look in’ means to visit someone for a short time.

  • I’ll look in on my way home and we can have a cup of tea.
  • Look in on Jenny and check that she is still working.

‘to look into’ means to examine a problem or situation.

  • My boss asked me to look into English classes at BBE.
  • We have set up a working group to look into the problem.

Let BBE help you with your phrasal verb problems! 

 

Thanks to Carolinebrownenglishlessons.org for the info

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