Tag Archive | verbos

Phrasal Verbs: Look Part II

It just doesn’t stop. So many varations with “look,” let’s keep looking at the options. Having trouble? Contact us today. 

to look on’ means to watch something happen.

  • The Police just looked on as the demonstrators marched peacefully through the streets.
  • Nobody helped me. They just looked on as I struggled to get up off the street.

‘to look on’ also means to consider someone or something in a special way.

  • We are very close. I look on him as my brother.
  • Don’t look on not getting the job as a failure. It’s not.

‘to look out’ means be careful. It is always an order.

  • Look out! The boss is coming.
  • Look out! You’re going to fall.

‘to look out for’ means to watch carefully around you so you will notice something or someone in particular.

  • When you go to the conference, look out for Anna. She will be there.
  • Janet is twenty next week. Can you look out for a present when you are in the shops?

‘to look out for’ can also mean to take care of someone.

  • Will is a great brother. He always looks out for his sisters.
  • She’s very selfish. She just looks out for herself.

‘to look over’ means to quickly examine something.

  • At the end of the exam, I only had a few minutes to look over what I had written.
  • The doctor quickly looked him over before sending him for an x-ray.

‘to look round’ means to walk through a building or place to have a look at it.

  • When you travel on business, you don’t have time to look round the places you visit.
  • The first time we looked round the house, we knew it was the house for us.

‘to look through’ means to quickly examine a text or some things.

  • I decided to give half my clothes away when I had looked through them.
  • We looked through the list of applicants and made a shortlist of the six best qualified.

‘to look up’ means to find a piece of information in a book or other source of information.

  • I didn’t know the word so I looked it up in the dictionary.
  • I looked their address up in the Yellow Pages.

‘to look up to’ means to respect and admire someone.

  • My father’s wonderful. He’s the person I most look up to.
  • All his employees look up to him and admire him

Once again, thanks to carolinebrownenglishlessons.com. Great resource! 

Advertisements

Phrasal Verbs: Look

‘to look after’ means to take care of someone or something.

  • When I have to travel on business, my parents usually look after my children.
  • I look after the office when my colleagues are away on business.

‘to look ahead’ means to think about and plan the future.

  • We have to look ahead and try to estimate our needs for the next few years.
  • In this business, it’s very difficult to look ahead and predict what will happen.

‘to look at’ means to read something quickly and not very thoroughly.

  • Could you look at my report and tell me if you think it’s OK?
  • I looked at your figures and they seem fine to me.

‘to look at’ can also mean to investigate or think carefully about a problem or situation.

  • Costs are getting out of control. We need to look at them closely.
  • John looked at renting cars but it would be too expensive.

‘to look back’ means to think about something that happened in the past.

  • I realise I was very naive when I look back.
  • If we look back over the last three years, we can see many times when we were very successful.

‘to look down on’ means to think something or someone is inferior.

  • The people who work in Headquarters always look down on the people in the branches.
  • Don’t look down on him just because he left school at 16. He has been very successful.

‘to look for’ means to try to find something lost or that you need.

  • My assistant is leaving at the end of the month. I’m looking for a new one.
  • He has been looking for a job for ages now.

‘to look forward to’ means to feel excited and happy about something that is going to happen.

  • I’m seeing him on Tuesday. I’m really looking forward to it.
  • We’re looking forward to our English classes. 

‘to look in’ means to visit someone for a short time.

  • I’ll look in on my way home and we can have a cup of tea.
  • Look in on Jenny and check that she is still working.

‘to look into’ means to examine a problem or situation.

  • My boss asked me to look into English classes at BBE.
  • We have set up a working group to look into the problem.

Let BBE help you with your phrasal verb problems! 

 

Thanks to Carolinebrownenglishlessons.org for the info

Present Perfect

FORM

[has/have + past participle]

Examples:

  • You have seen that movie many times.
  • Have you seen that movie many times?
Check out BBE’s list of irregular verbs here!

USE 1 Unspecified Time Before Now

We use the Present Perfect to say that an action happened at an unspecified time before now. The exact time is not important. You CANNOT use the Present Perfect with specific time expressions such as: yesterday, one year ago, last week, when I was a child, when I lived in Japan, at that moment, that day, one day, etc. We CAN use the Present Perfect with unspecific expressions such as: ever, never, once, many times, several times, before, so far, already, yet, etc.

Examples:

  • have seen that movie twenty times.
  • I think I have met him once before.
  • There have been many earthquakes in California.
  • People have traveled to the Moon.
  • People have not traveled to Mars.
  • Have you read the book yet?
  • Nobody has ever climbed that mountain.
  • A: Has there ever been a war in the United States?
    B: Yes, there has been a war in the United States.

How Do You Actually Use the Present Perfect?

The concept of “unspecified time” can be very confusing to English learners. But, in general, remember that the present perfect is used for an action in the past that has a result of now. 

It is best to associate Present Perfect with the following topics:

TOPIC 1 Experience

You can use the Present Perfect to describe your experience. It is like saying, “I have the experience of…” You can also use this tense to say that you have never had a certain experience. The Present Perfect is NOT used to describe a specific event.

Examples:

  • have been to France.
    This sentence means that you have had the experience of being in France. Maybe you have been there once, or several times.
  • have been to France three times.
    You can add the number of times at the end of the sentence.
  • have never been to France.
    This sentence means that you have not had the experience of going to France.
  • I think I have seen that movie before.
  • He has never traveled by train.
  • Joan has studied two foreign languages.
  • A: Have you ever met him?
    B: No, I have not met him.

TOPIC 2 Change Over Time

We often use the Present Perfect to talk about change that has happened over a period of time.

Examples:

  • You have grown since the last time I saw you.
  • The government has become more interested in arts education.
  • Japanese has become one of the most popular courses at the university since the Asian studies program was established.
  • My English has really improved since I moved to Australia.

TOPIC 3 Accomplishments

We often use the Present Perfect to list the accomplishments of individuals and humanity. You cannot mention a specific time.

Examples:

  • Man has walked on the Moon.
  • Our son has learned how to read.
  • Doctors have cured many deadly diseases.
  • Scientists have split the atom.

TOPIC 4 An Uncompleted Action You Are Expecting

We often use the Present Perfect to say that an action which we expected has not happened. Using the Present Perfect suggests that we are still waiting for the action to happen.

Examples:

  • James has not finished his homework yet.
  • Susan hasn’t mastered Japanese, but she can communicate.
  • Bill has still not arrived.
  • The rain hasn’t stopped.

TOPIC 5 Multiple Actions at Different Times

We also use the Present Perfect to talk about several different actions which have occurred in the past at different times. Present Perfect suggests the process is not complete and more actions are possible.

Examples:

  • The army has attacked that city five times.
  • have had four quizzes and five tests so far this semester.
  • We have had many major problems while working on this project.
  • She has talked to several specialists about her problem, but nobody knows why she is sick.

Time Expressions with Present Perfect

When we use the Present Perfect it means that something has happened at some point in our lives before now. Remember, the exact time the action happened is not important.

Sometimes, we want to limit the time we are looking in for an experience. We can do this with expressions such as: in the last week, in the last year, this week, this month, so far, up to now, etc.

Examples:

  • Have you been to Mexico in the last year?
  • have seen that movie six times in the last month.
  • They have had three tests in the last week.
  • She graduated from university less than three years ago. She has worked for three different companies so far.
  • My car has broken down three times this week.

NOTICE

“Last year” and “in the last year” are very different in meaning. “Last year” means the year before now, and it is considered a specific time which requires simple past. “In the last year” means from 365 days ago until now. It is not considered a specific time, so it requires Present Perfect.

Examples:

  • went to Mexico last year.
    I went to Mexico in the calendar year before this one.
  • have been to Mexico in the last year.
    I have been to Mexico at least once at some point between 365 days ago and now.

USE 2 Duration From the Past Until Now (Non-Continuous Verbs)

With Non-Continuous Verbs and non-continuous uses of Mixed Verbs, we use the Present Perfect to show that something started in the past and has continued up until now. “For five minutes,” “for two weeks,” and “since Tuesday” are all durations which can be used with the Present Perfect.

Examples:

  • have had a cold for two weeks.
  • She has been in England for six months.
  • Mary has loved chocolate since she was a little girl.

Although the above use of Present Perfect is normally limited to Non-Continuous Verbs and non-continuous uses of Mixed Verbs, the words “live,” “work,” “teach,” and “study” are sometimes used in this way even though they are NOT Non-Continuous Verbs.

ADVERB PLACEMENT

The examples below show the placement for grammar adverbs such as: always, only, never, ever, still, just, etc.

Examples:

  • You have only seen that movie one time.
  • Have you only seen that movie one time?

ACTIVE / PASSIVE

Examples:

  • Many tourists have visited that castle. Active
  • That castle has been visited by many tourists. Passive
At Bogotá Business English, we realize grammar is important. But, what’s more important than grammar exercises is making sure you can use it in conversation, for when it counts.

Phrasal Verbs with Out

If you ‘fall out’ with somebody, you have a bad argument with them.

  • They fell out over the arrangements for the meeting.
  • I don’t want to fall out with you but I’m very unhappy with what you have done.

If news ‘leaks out’, people who shouldn’t know about it do.

  • Details of the report leaked out over the weekend.
  • If this information leaks out, we are in serious trouble.

If you ‘come out with’ something, you say something suddenly.

  • She came straight out with it and said I was a liar.
  • You never know what he is going to come out with next.

If you ‘come out with’ a new product , you make available something new.

  • Microsoft have come out with a new version of Office.
  • We haven’t come out with a new product for two years.

If you ‘give out’ information,  you hand it out to people.

  • I’ll give out a summary at the end so you don’t need to take notes.
  • Could you give those papers out for me, please?

If something ‘gives out’, it stops working or supplies run out.

  • Our stock of leather will give out in three days, if we don’t get any more.
    My voice is about to give out so I’ll stop my presentation at this point.

If you are ‘let out’ of something, it can mean that you escape from doing something difficult or unpleasant or that you have agreed to do.

  • They won’t let us out of our contract with them.
  • He resigned this morning which lets me out from having to fire him.

If you ‘make something out’, it can mean that you are able to see or hear something with difficulty.

  • I couldn’t make out what he was saying with all that background noise.
  • I can’t make out who sent me this letter.

To ‘make out something’ can mean to claim falsely that something is true.

  • He made out that he had a lot of experience in this area but it wasn’t true.
  • He’s not as difficult a person as he is often made out to be.

If you are ‘put out’, it can mean that you are annoyed or caused extra work by something that is said or done.

  • He seemed put out that we didn’t ask him to join us for lunch.
  • I don’t want to put you out. Don’t do it if it is too much bother.

Put out by English? Why don’t you get in touch with BBE?